This month in the Daring Kitchen we were challenged to make Piroshki by Sara at Sassy Suppers.

Sara tells us that …”according to Anne Volokh in her book The Art of Russian Cuisine, pirozhki have been sold as street food since Peter the Great’s time. They have also been served during elaborate banquets both in Russia and Paris. At the turn of the century, one could find fabulous pirozhki at the Filippov Bakery. The hand-held fried pies would be stuffed with all sorts of things . . . meat, mushrooms, rice, eggs, cheese and jam. Pirozhki are still sold on the street in Russian cities today and many a home baker has a favorite recipe.”

I have also been waiting to try a couple of piroshki recipes from that great book by Greg PatentA Baker’s Odyssey” so I thought this was the perfect opportunity to try baking and frying piroshki in a Piroshki Fest! This is adds to my personal challenge of baking through A Baker’s Odyssey with recipe #45 and #46.


A Baker’s Odyssey provides two fried piroshki recipes one of beef and the other mushroom.  A yeast dough is generally used for fried piroshki. In this case the dough for the mushroom piroshki was sweetened with a little sugar.

I used the gorgeous sour cream pastry provided by Sara in our Daring Kitchen challenge to bake Beef Piroshki using the beef filling in A Baker’s Odyssey. With the remaining beef filling I made fried piroshki. And to complete the Piroshki Fest, Lithuanian Mushroom Piroshki from A Baker’s Odyssey completed the meal!

Yep, I was all piroshki-ed out by the end. The verdict – Beef Piroshki filling from A Baker’s Odyssey is moist and delicious and is a perfect combination with the sour cream pastry or fried in yeast pastry.

For the sour cream pastry recipe please click here but this time I won’t provide the two recipes from A Baker’s Odyssey…just a little incentive to buy a copy for yourself! If you would like to join us next month in the Daring Kitchen check it out here for yourself

The sour cream pastry was rolled very thinly before being topped with the beef filling, folded and sealed ready for baking.

The yeast dough was soft and tender and easy to work with.

Little pillows of goodness encased in sour cream pastry were crimped around the edges.

My fried piroshki browned very quickly due to the sugar content in the yeast dough but the tender dough was cooked through. This minced beef filling was moist and flavorful with hints of thyme and dill.

These baked piroshki were deliciously moreish with golden, flaky pastry.

With a dab of sour cream they were perfect.